Movie Review >> Welcome to Me

Welcome_to_Me_posterWelcome to Me (2014)

GENRE: Comedy, Drama

DIRECTOR: Shira Piven

WRITER: Eliot Laurence

STARS: Kristen Wiig, Wes Bentley, James Marsden, Linda Cardellini, Joan Cusack, Tim Robbins, Thomas Mann

COUNTRY: USA

PLOT: When Alice Klieg quits her psychiatric meds she wins the Mega-Millions lottery and immediately buys her own talk show.


 

Alice Kleig has ‘borderline personality disorder’ for which she sees her therapist, Dr, Moffat (Tim Robbins). She spends most of her time buying lottery tickets and watching Oprah Winfrey re-runs on her TV that hasn’t been switched off for 11 years. She has given up on her meds and decided to regulate her moods with protein (cheese strings).

When he lottery numbers come in and she wins 86 million dollars, she moves into an American-Indian reservation casino. Whilst at the filming of a cable TV infomercial she ends up on TV for the second time (the first time was earlier that week when she made a speech after winning the lottery, but her big moment as cut short when she was cut off by the network censors).

Studio head Rich Ruskin sees potential for exploitation and Alice is allowed to pitch for her own show, which she eventually gets at a cost of $15m for 100 episodes, which she immediately pays in full. The show, entitled Welcome to Me, is basically about whatever is on her mind on a particular day and starts off with very low production values. When Alice challenges this she is told that she can have top notch production, but it will cost. Alice once again writes a cheque. As the show rises in popularity, Alice starts to alienate more of her friends and slander more of her acquaintances with amusing (but never hilarious) consequences.

With such low production values of it’s own, the film contains a surprisingly high profile cast with Joan Cusack joining Robbins and Marsden as the TV studio programme director. All play reasonable parts and the film is a fun waste of an hour and a half, but it never really rises above that. Go into it with expectations low and you should be pleasantly satisfied, but don’t expect a comedic masterpiece about the fragility of the human mind, as it is far from that.


 



 

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